Andrea Elena Ibáñez

is an anthropologist trained at Syracuse University and Duke University who most recently retired from a career as a public administrator with the City of Tucson. She has published scores of articles about travel, culture, history, and the Southwest in the Tucson Weekly, Valley Guide Quarterly, Tucson Guide Quarterly and The New York Times. She was the author of the chapters on Tucson and Southern Arizona in Fodor’s 1999 Arizona guide and Fodor’s USA 1999 guide.

New in 2017 “A Tanager’s Tale.

Even fictional people need a weekend off sometimes

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After a few long weeks of living, loving, scheming, talking, thinking, planning, arguing, and finally coming to the halfway point of the first draft of “A Hoot Owl’s Call,” the first book in the Carolina Trilogy II, my fictional folks took the weekend off.
Whew.
That means, aside from not following what they are doing and writing it down, I was also relieved of them chattering away in my head during otherwise quiet moments.
PBS binge Sunday night and then back to the factory!

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Vicky and Me

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Vicky and me
For those of you who watched “Victoria” on PBS for the past few months, here is a roundabout anecdote that can get you past the withdrawal.
At the Tucson FOB this past weekend, where I was hawking my new book,”WASTE WATER,” one of the authors in the Indie Tent (Independently published authors-nothing to do with Harrison Ford) brought his pregnant wife who is due in a few months. Being very tiny, she was a bit worried about how large the baby was projected to be and said she hoped there would be no problem.
It reminded me of a conversation I had with an older woman when I was pregnant with my first child many years ago who related that when she was at that same stage, her mother said there was nothing to it. You started to feel labor pains, they ‘put you out,’ and when you woke up, the baby was in your arms. At the time, I was horrified by the lack of information about childbirth for that generation of women, and the young woman I related it to was wide-eyed with disbelief.
But then I remembered that it was Queen Victoria who inadvertently popularized anesthesia during childbirth. She had nine children and after the birth of her seventh decided that something ought to be done about what they probably called the “discomfort” of the process. She and Prince Albert connected with physician John Snow who recommended chloroform, rather than ether, which had come into use during surgical procedures and was presumed safer. Thus, she had the soon to be famous experience of being ‘put out’ and waking up to a baby in her arms.
Dr. John Snow not only promulgated anesthesia and better hygiene in surgical situations, he is credited with linking the germ theory to the spread of cholera, a virulent disease often found in crowded areas and previously thought to be cause by ‘miasma.’
So, John Snow did know something after all.

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Writing in a Cave

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Really.
I wrote most of “A Tanager’s Tale” at the entrance to this cave on Palawan in the Philippines last spring.
While the archaeologists dug, I sat and pounded out the 3rd book of the ‘Carolina Triology.’ (That’s my laptop case to the right)
More later.
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Coming soon! # 3

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After a year of stop and go writing here and in the mouth of a cave in Asia, I am pleased to announce that the third book in the Carolina Trilogy is almost ready. I’ll keep you updated.  Thanks – Andreatanager-cover2

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